3 Things To Do Before Sending Your Resume

Everyone who is looking for a job knows how hard it is to differentiate oneself from the rest of the applicants and get that first interview. A creative way for your resume to pop up from the rest of the candidates is trying to begin your resume identifying your values and purpose, this way, you present your skill-set and experience as an attractive option to potential employers,

Here is some #mondaymotivation for your job search, and pretty good advice to start editing that LinkedIn profile of yours.

Identify your values and mission.

Try to match the specifications of the job posts to the examples below to add that wow factor that will set you aside from the rest of the resume that managed to beat the recruiter’s automated system.

  • Find an outlet for my creativity, skills, abilities, and energies that will not only benefit myself but will help others also.
  • Make a valuable and lasting contribution to my community and to society.
  • Collaborate in a place where I can be involved in constructive endeavors that aligned to my life’s vision of (explain what it is) and my values (list your values)
white paper with be yourself everyone else is already taken print
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Be SMART

Use the SMART acronym to find the kind of job you are looking for, and that matches your values and life’s purpose and not only some of the skills you have, using the SMART acronym helps to reduce the hassle of the already stressful job searching process

  • Specific: Be very specific of the kind of job you are looking for, experience, and skills-wise only.
  • Measurable: Describe the type of employment you want, full time? Part-time, at least 40 hours per week? Travel? Office?
  • Achievable: Consider ALL your limitations: skills, age, education, certificates, experience. Can you do something to achieve this job? Internships, online certificates, diplomas, licenses. When you find the Jack Sparrow’s fountain of youth, please let me know.
  • Relevant: Analyze if the job positions you’ve been saving are suitable for you, not income-wise, but regarding happiness, would you fill fulfilled and happy with the job for the next couple of years?
  • Timed: How much time do you need to prepare for the positions?  Are there any training periods or probationary periods to fulfill before you are actually hired? How many interviews and how many companies do you plan to talk to before settling on the right one.

 

typewriter
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Have a personal library

I’m a book worm, so for me, it is essential to have reference books and material to go to and make sure that what I’m doing is on track. It is always good to have the latest best-sellers in your career section.

How to write a killer LinkedIn Profile, and 18 mistakes to avoid by Brenda Bernstein whether you are looking for a job or not, this is your next must-have-book in your library.

What Color is Your Parachute?  By Richard N. Bolles. The world’s most popular job-hunting guide, revised and updated annually with more than ten million copies sold. This newly streamlined edition features the latest resources, case studies, and perspectives on today’s job market, revealing surprising advice on what works—and what doesn’t—so you can focus your efforts on tactics that yield results.

Cover Letters for Dummies by Joice Lain Kennedy is quite useful if you have writer’s block and need a tool “that short-circuits the competition.”

woman lying on area rug reading books
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Remember that I am an Amazon Associate, so I do earn from qualifying purchases.

 

 

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